DIY print a tribal patterned t-shirt

DIY print a tribal patterned t-shirt Sweet Verdana.jpg_effected

Tribal patterns are very trendy right now. They are graphic and easy to DIY and print/draw on your clothes. See the full tutorial on how to stencil this t-shirts over at Sweet Verbana.

Outi Les Pyy

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3 comments:

  1. Those outside the US may want to familiarize themselves with the potentially offensive/tone-deaf use of designs which belong to Native peoples before imitating this look: http://colorlines.com/archives/2011/10/navajo_nation_urban_outfitters.html

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  2. Skoog..pertaining to that article, yes enterprising on the Navajo namesake and marketing under it is on that slippery slope of capitalistic dos and dont's. But art, form, image, pattern, and the like are harder to trademark, even if it is reminiscent of a cultures past uses of it. Obviously there are symbols and signs, some recognizable and some not so, that bring a great deal of defense with them, but that is usually reliant on a meaning being tied to said symbol or sign. what you have here is a tutorial on putting pretty patterns with no discernible or hidden meaning on your clothes, not a swastika. what is offensive to the cultures these patterns arose from (and i hate to tell you, but these specific patterns were being used to decorate long before the Navajo peoples harbored them) is the use of a cultures name and practices by people like 'H&M', 'Forever 21', 'unionbay' and so on, to make money with no real interest or honor to the history of these things. Do not discourage peoples from wearing native print on themselves in tribute to culture and art in general. Look only down your nose at your local hip cultural fracking department stores :]

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  3. Skoog..pertaining to that article, yes enterprising on the Navajo namesake and marketing under it is on that slippery slope of capitalistic dos and dont's. But art, form, image, pattern, and the like are harder to trademark, even if it is reminiscent of a cultures past uses of it. Obviously there are symbols and signs, some recognizable and some not so, that bring a great deal of defense with them, but that is usually reliant on a meaning being tied to said symbol or sign. what you have here is a tutorial on putting pretty patterns with no discernible or hidden meaning on your clothes, not a swastika. what is offensive to the cultures these patterns arose from (and i hate to tell you, but these specific patterns were being used to decorate long before the Navajo peoples harbored them) is the use of a cultures name and practices by people like 'H&M', 'Forever 21', 'unionbay' and so on, to make money with no real interest or honor to the history of these things. Do not discourage peoples from wearing native print on themselves in tribute to culture and art in general. Look only down your nose at your local hip cultural fracking department stores :]

    ReplyDelete